GNLP0525R

Showing comments and forms 1 to 7 of 7

Object

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 18114

Received: 08/12/2018

Respondent: Mr Chris Alderson

Representation:

Wymondham is constantly expanding and swallowing up the countryside. We wish this area to remain rural as we enjoy the peace and quiet of rural Norfolk. More houses means more traffic and more noise and air pollution. It leads to more rat-running through surrounding villages, making it more dangerous to walk.

Full text:

Wymondham is constantly expanding and swallowing up the countryside. We wish this area to remain rural as we enjoy the peace and quiet of rural Norfolk. More houses means more traffic and more noise and air pollution. It leads to more rat-running through surrounding villages, making it more dangerous to walk.

Comment

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 18572

Received: 12/12/2018

Respondent: Welbeck Strategic Land III Ltd

Agent: Bidwells

Representation:

The site includes site GNLP0006 which has been promoted separately. GNLP0006 can be brought forward independently of the remainder of site GNLP0525R, as previously demonstrated. If the quantum of growth directed to Wymondham requires all of site GNLP0525R to come forward, we recognise the potential benefits of a combined approach, but do not commit to delivery of the Barton Willmore Masterplan for the wider site.

Full text:

This Representation has been prepared by Bidwells LLP, on behalf of Welbeck Strategic Land III Ltd. Site GNLP0525R includes a significant parcel of land, adjacent to Tuttles Lane, for which Welbeck Strategic Land III Ltd have a promotion agreement, and which has been promoted independently under Site Reference GNLP0006.

We wish to emphasise that site GNLP0006 can be brought forward independently of the remainder of site GNLP0525R. As demonstrated in the Representation made at Stage A of the Regulation 18 Consultation, earlier in 2018, and the accompanying Vision and Delivery Document and suite of technical reports, site GNLP0006 is, in its own right, entirely deliverable, and capable of making a significant contribution towards satisfying the Councils' housing needs during the period to 2036. It represents a suitable location for development now, is available immediately, is achievable with a realistic prospect of housing being delivered on the site, and is viable.

If the quantum of growth directed to Wymondham requires all of Site GNLP0525R to come forward, we would recognise the potential benefits of a combined approach, but would not wish to commit to the delivery of the Masterplan presented by Barton Willmore in their March 2018 Representation.

Support

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 18771

Received: 12/12/2018

Respondent: Norfolk FA

Representation:

Norfolk FA are supportive of residential development in Wymondham, associated to the proposed S106 agreement which could provide an open space & recreational facilities which could support local football provision associated to Wymondham Town FC.

Full text:

Norfolk FA are supportive of residential development in Wymondham, associated to the proposed S106 agreement which could provide an open space & recreational facilities which could support local football provision associated to Wymondham Town FC.

Support

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 19186

Received: 14/12/2018

Respondent: Gladman Developments

Representation:

Gladman submit that the site is available and suitable for residential development and request that the Council consider the benefits listed above and note the ability of the site to assist in meeting the objectively assessed need across the Greater Norwich plan area. We consider that the site should be allocated for residential development and would welcome the opportunity to discuss our proposals with the Council in more detail.

Full text:

These representations are made by Gladman Developments Ltd in reference to site GNLPR2153 detailed in the ongoing consultation. Gladman specialise in the promotion of strategic land for residential development with associated community infrastructure.
Gladman has considerable experience in the development industry across a number of sectors, including residential and employment development. From that experience, we understand the need for the planning system to provide local communities with the homes and jobs that are needed to ensure residents have access to the homes and employment opportunities that are required to meet future development needs of the area and contribute towards sustainable economic development.
Gladman has been involved in contributing to the plan preparation process across England through the submission of written representations and participation at local plan public examinations. It is on the basis of that experience that these representations have been prepared.
In accordance with Section 19 of the 2004 Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act, policies set out in local plans must be subject to Sustainability Appraisal (SA). Incorporating the requirements of the Environmental Assessment of Plans and Programmes Regulations 2004 (SEA Regulations), SA is a systematic process that should be undertaken at each stage of the Plan's preparation, assessing the effects of the Local Plan's proposals on sustainable development when judged against reasonable alternatives.
The GNLPR should ensure that the results of the SA process clearly justify its policy choices, including the proposed site allocations and the approach taken to new growth when judged against 'all reasonable alternatives'. In meeting the development needs of the area, it should be clear from the results of the assessment why some policy options have been progressed and others have been rejected. The Councils' decision making, and scoring should be robust, justified and transparent and should be undertaken through a comparative and equal assessment of each reasonable alternative. Too often the SA process flags up the negative aspects of development whilst not fully considering the positive aspects which can be brought about through new opportunities for housing development and how these can influence landscape issues, social concerns and the economy.
Gladman would like to take this opportunity to advise the Council that we have been retained to promote the land off Norwich Common. The site forms part of GNLP0525R for the purposes of this consultation. It is currently envisaged that the 39.7ha site could deliver up to 730 homes, associated green infrastructure, and public open space.
A development brief, including site location plan will be submitted alongside this representation. Gladman believe that the site offers a real opportunity to the residents of the local community and the wider area to assist in meeting the identified housing needs and deliver significant improvements to the public realm, including the provision of land for community uses.
The site is free from significant constraints. It is not subject to, nor especially sensitive in terms of, any built or natural protection designations and it is expected that the proposed housing development will not result in significant harm in terms of acknowledged amenity, community, heritage, landscape, traffic, environmental, technical or other acknowledged public interests.
The site can be directly accessed off Norwich Common which forms the sites northern boundary. The site is contained to the west by existing residential development. The eastern field boundary is bordered by interspersed hedgerows, with the A11 forming the majority of the southern boundary.
The development of this site represents a logical expansion of Wymondham. The development of this site provides the following community benefits:
- Improvements to the local economy and increased footfall to the existing businesses of Wymondham. The development of this site will help to maintain a thriving and vibrant community and will ensure the longevity of local services such as shops, community facilities and schools.
- Deliver a mix of housing types and sizes to meet strategic needs of the local housing market, including market and affordable housing. This will demonstrably support and secure the current and future vitality of the local area. New homes will enable people to access the housing market locally rather than being forced to move away due to a lack of available housing.
- The development site would aim to enhance the environment through the provision of green infrastructure, comprising new public open space and equipped area of play, recreational pathways which will increase the permeability of the surrounding area.
- The site is located almost entirely in Flood Zone 1 in its entirety. The developable area is therefore in Flood Zone 1 - Very Low Risk - with an annual probability of flooding less than 0.1% (1 in 1000).
- There is the potential for the site to accommodate land for a primary school and local service centre.
- The development of this site will result in net biodiversity gains.
- Enhanced permeability with the local area.
We note that the site has been assessed as part of the HELAA Addendum, published in October 2018. Within the report, the wider site (GNLP0525R) is recognised as having an area that is large enough to mitigate against any constraints that exist within the boundary. It is noted that development on the area of the site that Gladman have interest in, would not impact on any designated ecological sites, sensitive landscapes or townscapes. It is also worthy to note that while the area that Gladman seek to promote is within the strategic gap between Hethersett and Wymondham, it is reasonable to conclude that it will have less of an impact on the strategic gap due to its location further south and on the southern side of Norwich Common than that consider acceptable by the Secretary of State on the opposite side of Norwich Common (APP/L2630/W/15/3007004):
15. Overall, the Secretary of State agrees with the Inspector's conclusion that despite being contrary to Policy DM 4.7 and the harms identified, the Parcel B site is an area, which if developed for housing, would not have such a significant impact on the separation between settlements as might arise at other points within the strategic gap. He also agrees that allowing development here would be easy to define and so would not set a precedent which would undermine the remaining strategic gap.
The same conclusions can be drawn here, the development edge can be clearly defined, will not have a significant impact on the settlement between the settlements that might arise at other points within the strategic gap.
Gladman are committed to producing a comprehensive suite of technical reports to support any planning application that may be submitted. This work will include, but is not limited to, a transport assessment, ecological surveys, a socio-economic report and archaeological assessment. We are keen to assist the Council in assessing the development potential of the site.
Gladman submit that the site is available and suitable for residential development and request that the Council consider the benefits listed above and note the ability of the site to assist in meeting the objectively assessed need across the Greater Norwich plan area. We consider that the site should be allocated for residential development and would welcome the opportunity to discuss our proposals with the Council in more detail.
Gladman welcome the opportunity to comment on the GNLPR sites and hope that the Council find these submissions constructive. Gladman request to be added to the consultation database and look forward to reviewing future versions of the GNLPR in due course.

Attachments:

Object

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 19231

Received: 14/12/2018

Respondent: Mrs Vivien Alderson

Representation:

As a Carer it has become increasingly dangerous to walk with another person the triangle of Mill Road, Church Road and Barford Road in Marlingford. There are no footpaths, (just banks and hedges full of holly, brambles and nettles). These country roads were not designed to take artic lorries and 3.5t vans. I suffer from bronchiectesis and the exhaust fumes polluting the air exacerbate it. The volume of traffic cutting through our village, (which is much shorter than the A47 Bypass) the noise and greenhouse gases will again increase, whereas I thought we were meant to be reducing the latter.

Full text:

As a Carer it has become increasingly dangerous to walk with another person the triangle of Mill Road, Church Road and Barford Road in Marlingford. There are no footpaths, (just banks and hedges full of holly, brambles and nettles). These country roads were not designed to take artic lorries and 3.5t vans. I suffer from bronchiectesis and the exhaust fumes polluting the air exacerbate it. The volume of traffic cutting through our village, (which is much shorter than the A47 Bypass) the noise and greenhouse gases will again increase, whereas I thought we were meant to be reducing the latter.

Comment

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 19487

Received: 13/12/2018

Respondent: Pelham (South Wymondham) Ltd

Agent: dha Planning

Representation:

Site GNLP 0525R is an extension/enlargement of GNLP 00006 to the northern extent of Wymondham. It is therefore predicated on the assumption that the respective promoters are now advancing the site as a single opportunity.

In general terms we support the scale of growth that is being promoted, which is akin to that being advocated by our client. The 2018 updated Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) is clear (Para 72) that the supply of large numbers of new homes can often be best achieved through planning for larger scale development, such as new settlements or significant extensions to existing villages and towns, provided they are well located and designed, and supported by the necessary infrastructure and facilities.

However, having regard to this latter point, we consider that location at north Wymondham is far less suitable than to the south. Development to the north/north east will inevitably have an adverse impact upon the separation of Wymondham and Herthersett and has the potential for causing the coalescence of the two settlements. Regard must also be had to lack of physical boundaries and the potential for unrestricted urban sprawl to the north. In contrast, expansion to the south is both sustainable and can be restricted to the hard boundary provided by the A11 and so providing an opportunity to prevent growth from sprawling beyond this natural barrier.

From a wider perspective, the existing orientation of the settlement puts the heart of the town centre and key transport hubs on the outer southern edge some distance away from this area in the north. In this regard, paragraph 85 of the NPPF is clear that planning policies and decisions should support the role that town centres play at the heart of local communities, by taking a positive approach to their growth, management and adaptation. Promotion of growth to the north would do far less to support the town centre than if it were directed to the south.

Having regard to the above, whilst we support the principle of strategic growth, we consider our client's land represents a better and more sustainable and economically beneficial site option for the growth, with far superior links to public transport.

Full text:

On behalf of Pelham (South Wymondham) Ltd, (hereafter referred to as 'Pelham'), we wish to comment on the additional sites currently being considered as part of the latest Regulation 18 consultation. The representation should be read in conjunction with Pelham's site consultation comments of March 2018 that support the allocation of land within its ownership at South Wymondham (site reference GNLP0515).

Prior to commenting on the new sites, we would remind the authority that our client's site GNLP0515 is situated within a sustainable location close to Wymondham Railway Station with excellent links to the many facilities and amenities within the town.

It benefits from good access to core public transport hubs, the strategic road network, would integrate well with the existing ongoing expansion of the town and would represent a logical and sustainable area for future growth. Furthermore, the existing orientation of the settlement puts the heart of the town centre on the outer southern edge and so expansion immediately to the south of the town centre will place it in the centre of the expanded urban area, strengthening the appeal of the town centre and improving economic conditions as is the objective of a 'main town'.

A phase 1 development of 1230 houses is currently underway at South Wymondham and the proposed Phase 2 adjoining development could deliver a minimum of a further 1,375 more homes.

The land is approximately 78 ha, half of which is proposed for residential led mixed use development. Initial concepts suggest 39 ha could be utilised to deliver a minimum of 1,375 new homes, a new school and associated retail and commercial floorspace, all of which would complement the emerging area of growth and benefit existing residents. The residual 39ha could be retained as open space to enhance the wider green infrastructure network.

The scale of growth that could be provided is very much needed. In this regard, Broadland District Council, Norwich City Council and South Norfolk Council are working together with Norfolk County Council to prepare the Greater Norwich Local Plan (GNLP). Early evidence has been established by the Central Norfolk Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA) 2017, which identified the OAN for Greater Norwich from 2015 to 2036 as 39,486 homes (1,880 per annum).

Given the context and the need for new housing, we provide comments on the associated new housing options for Wymondham below.

Site GNLP 0525R is an extension/enlargement of GNLP 00006 to the northern extent of Wymondham. It is therefore predicated on the assumption that the respective promoters are now advancing the site as a single opportunity.

In general terms we support the scale of growth that is being promoted, which is akin to that being advocated by our client. The 2018 updated Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) is clear (Para 72) that the supply of large numbers of new homes can often be best achieved through planning for larger scale development, such as new settlements or significant extensions to existing villages and towns, provided they are well located and designed, and supported by the necessary infrastructure and facilities.

However, having regard to this latter point, we consider that location at north Wymondham is far less suitable than to the south. Development to the north/north east will inevitably have an adverse impact upon the separation of Wymondham and Herthersett and has the potential for causing the coalescence of the two settlements. Regard must also be had to lack of physical boundaries and the potential for unrestricted urban sprawl to the north. In contrast, expansion to the south is both sustainable and can be restricted to the hard boundary provided by the A11 and so providing an opportunity to prevent growth from sprawling beyond this natural barrier.

From a wider perspective, the existing orientation of the settlement puts the heart of the town centre and key transport hubs on the outer southern edge some distance away from this area in the north. In this regard, paragraph 85 of the NPPF is clear that planning policies and decisions should support the role that town centres play at the heart of local communities, by taking a positive approach to their growth, management and adaptation. Promotion of growth to the north would do far less to support the town centre than if it were directed to the south.

Having regard to the above, whilst we support the principle of strategic growth, we consider our client's land represents a better and more sustainable and economically beneficial site option for the growth, with far superior links to public transport.

Site GNLP 2073 at Burnthouse Lane, Silfield is less than 1ha and has the capacity to deliver only circa 5 dwellings.

The scale of development would contribute little to the objective of meeting the compelling housing need for both market and affordable housing. Furthermore, it would be unlikely to offer anything by way of developer contributions to offset the pressure on local infrastructure.

Nevertheless, we do recognise that paragraph 68 of the NPPF provides some support for small and medium sized proposals and that 10% of the housing requirement should be delivered on sites of less than 1ha. A balance is therefore needed.

Notwithstanding the importance of smaller sites, GNLP 2073 is detached from the settlement boundary and rural in nature. It benefits from little by way of safe and accessible linkages. Burnthouse Lane lacks public footpaths and the site is not easily accessible to public transport opportunities. Whilst para 7 of the NPPF seeks to promote sustainable development in rural areas, it is also clear that housing should be located where it will enhance or maintain the vitality of rural communities, which would not be the case in this instance.

Having regard to the above, we consider our client's land represents a better and more sustainable and economically beneficial site option for growth.

Site GNLP 2090 East of Field House is capable of delivering circa 50 units. However, it is detached from the main settlement of Wymondham and would fail to represent a suitable and logical natural expansion of Wymondham.

The site is rural in nature and benefits from poor accessibility. Silfield Street lacks public footpaths and the site is not easily accessible to public transport.

As set out above, para 7 of the NPPF seeks to promote sustainable development in rural areas, it is also clear that housing should be located where it will enhance or maintain the vitality of rural communities.

Given the characteristics of the site this would not enlarge or compliment an established rural community. Furthermore, there are wider heritage and ecological constraints.

Having regard to the above, we consider our client's land represents a more sustainable and economically beneficial site opportunity.

Site GNLP 2125 South of Norwich Common is less than 0.5 ha and has the capacity to deliver only circa 8 dwellings, which even then would be drastically out of character with the prevailing area.

We do, again, recognise that 10% of the housing requirement should be delivered on sites of less than 1ha. Nonetheless, the scale of development would provide little to meeting housing need. Furthermore, it would be unlikely to offer anything by way of developer contributions to offset the pressure on local infrastructure.

The site is also identified as being at risk of surface water flooding.

Having regard to the above, we consider our client's land represents a better and more sustainable and economically beneficial site option for growth.

Site GNLP 2150 appears to be part of 0525R to the northern extent of Wymondham and it is unclear as to whether the site and its potential has been double counted. It is again predicated on the assumption that the larger parcel of land comes forward, as in isolation it would be detached from the settlement boundary.

As set out previously, development to the north of Wymondham is less suitable than to the south. It will inevitably have an adverse impact upon the separation of settlements and there is no hard physical barrier to development in the north.

The existing orientation of the settlement puts the heart of the town centre and key transport hubs on the outer southern edge rather than the north.

Having regard to the above, we consider our client's land represents a better and more sustainable and economically beneficial site option for growth.


Site GNLP 2155 is located to the north of Wymondham. It contains the curtilage of Downham Grove House, lies to the west of recently developed housing in the north of Wymondham at Carpenters Close.

As set out above, development to the north is less suitable than to the south and there is no hard physical barrier to properly contain growth and the town centre and key transport hubs on the outer southern edge.

Some areas are at surface water flood risk; and, a pond, along with two wooded areas, that may trigger the need for an ecological assessment.

Having regard to the above, we consider the site appears unsuitable for a number of reasons and our client's land represents a better and more sustainable and economically beneficial site option for growth with far superior links to public transport.

Site GNLP 2157 is located to the south west of Wymondham.

The site is rural in nature and benefits from poor linkages. London Road lacks public footpaths and the site is not easily accessible to public transport opportunities.

It is detached from the settlement boundary and rural in nature. Whilst para 7 of the NPPF seeks to promote sustainable development in rural areas, it is also clear that housing should be located where it will enhance or maintain the vitality of rural communities, which would not be the case in this instance.

Having regard to the above, we consider our client's land represents a better and more sustainable and economically beneficial site option for growth.

Site GNLP 2168 consists of 340 ha and is proposed for a new settlement of some 6,500 dwellings south of the A11.

Parts of the land are of Grade 2 agricultural value; there are wooded areas (some of which is ancient woodland); ponds and habitat on site are likely to require ecological investigation.

There are several options to approach meeting housing need, including proportionate growth, larger urban extensions or even the development of new garden villages. We favour the expansion of settlements like Wymondham given the existing infrastructure that can accommodate the growth. In contrast, the provision of a new garden settlement with its own identity and self-sustaining facilities is extremely challenging, albeit not unachievable.

The supply of large numbers of new homes can often be best achieved through planning for larger scale development. In terms of when garden villages become a suitable approach, the 2016 Locally-Led Garden Villages, Towns and Cities prospectus announced broad Government support for 'garden villages', defined as new settlements of a minimum of 1,500 homes and that must be embedded with the key garden city principles. To be a genuine garden village it must be a holistically planned and designed in such a way that development enhances the natural environment and offers high-quality affordable housing and locally accessible work in beautiful, healthy and sociable communities. Garden village principles are an indivisible and interlocking framework for delivery, and include:
* Community ownership of land and long-term stewardship of assets.
* Mixed-tenure homes and housing types that are genuinely affordable.
* A wide range of local jobs in the Garden City within easy commuting distance of homes.
* Beautifully and imaginatively designed homes with gardens, combining the best of town and country to create healthy communities, and including opportunities to grow food.
* Development that enhances the natural environment, providing a comprehensive green infrastructure network and net biodiversity gains, and that uses zero-carbon and energy-positive technology to ensure climate resilience.
* Strong cultural, recreational and shopping facilities in walkable, vibrant, sociable neighbourhoods.
* Integrated and accessible transport systems, with walking, cycling and public transport designed to be the most attractive forms of local transport.

Whilst it may be possible to meet these criteria, we have concern about whether such a level of masterplanning could be achieved within the emerging plan period. Accordingly, it is essential that further information is published to establish the deliverability and suitability of the site as a garden village location. Should the site come forward for development there would be a requirement for major infrastructure improvements, including a potential new junction from the A11, which would inevitably require use of land within our client's control and therefore early engagement would be needed.

Having regard to the above, we consider that a new settlement in this location may be feasible but is more of a longer term option that would be for subsequent plan periods. Should it be seen favourably, it should be designed in such a way that would not sterilise our client's land nor prohibit the sustainable future expansion of south Wymondham within the A11 boundary.

In summary, our client's land represents a better and more sustainable and economically beneficial site option for growth in line with the current draft strategy.

Site GNLP 2169 is located to the south of Wymondham within the heart of the existing phase1 commitments and as such care is needed to ensure against double counting.

In the event that the land is achievable, it represents a sustainable location for growth, albeit at an extremely limited scale.

Having regard to the above, we consider our client's land represents a better and more sustainable and economically beneficial site option for growth.

Summary
Pelham (South Wymondham) Ltd is promoting land within its ownership at South Wymondham (reference GNLP0515) for sustainable residential led mixed use expansion.

Pelham has previously promoted and is delivering major growth to the west and east of Silfield Road (Phase 1). Our client directly obtained the relevant outline permission for the existing planned growth and the detailed phases of development are subsequently now being delivered on the ground by national housebuilders. Pelham therefore has a good track record of delivery. The land now being proposed amounts to what would logically be considered as a second phase of the development and therefore the ability to properly integrate new development makes site GNLP0515 the ideal location for growth.

The combined effect of the Phase 1 development of 1230 houses currently underway at South Wymondham and the proposed Phase 2 adjoining development of a minimum of 1,375 houses re-balancing the position of the town centre and enabling sustainable growth to be delivered, with significant economic benefits for the town centre.

Phase 2 could deliver a minimum of 1,375 new homes, a new school and associated retail and commercial floorspace, all of which would complement the emerging area of growth. The residual 39ha would be retained as open space to enhance the wider green infrastructure network.

Whilst detailed proposals are yet to be advanced and would be subject to meaningful dialogue with the LPA, the Local Community and key stakeholders, it is clear that the site is wholly suitable for residential development. From an environmental perspective, the land has extremely low landscape value and does not form any formal planning designation such as green belt or area of outstanding natural beauty. Furthermore, there are no overriding environmental constraints that would prevent development.

The site does not lie within or in immediate proximity to any nationally or European designated site such that development of the site would be contrary to the Habitat Regulations or adversely affect the integrity of any designated sites. The closest site of note is the Lower Wood Ashwellthorpe SSSI which is some 3km to the south east and will remain undisturbed.

The predominant land use within the site is agriculture the majority of which is arable in nature. There are no public records of any farming related Environmental Stewardship Schemes in existence within the site which confirms that the actively farmed areas of the site are likely to be of limited ecological value.

Arboriculture investigations will be required. However, we do not envisage tree impact to be an absolute constraint to development. The majority of trees on the site are in groups that can be maintained and incorporated into landscape and open space features. Furthermore, substantially increased levels of planting are likely to be achieved as a result of a comprehensive landscape led approach to the masterplanning process. There are no areas of ancient woodland.

The site falls within an area that does not directly impact the setting of any listed building. Furthermore, given the locality of the land, the relative distance to the nearest listed building and Scheduled Monuments, the archaeological potential of a site is considered to be low. However, the site consists of undeveloped land and therefore there remains some element of risk of an archaeological find and therefore a precautionary approach would be applied.

The site itself comprises a mixture of arable land and a number of perimeter trees. However, overall the site is considered to be of low or limited ecological value and this is not considered to represent a significant risk to its development potential.

Any development could be progressed immediately with approximately 300 new homes being capable for delivery in the immediate first five years of the plan period. The emerging Bovis and Taylor Wimpey scheme on the Phase 1 site delivers a new access link onto Park Lane which would form the principal access to the initial 300 units that can immediately be delivered to the west of Park Lane. A further emergency access could also be achieved adjacent to the Green Land/Park Lane junction but would not be reliant on this for any through traffic.

Subsequent phases will require upgrading of the highway network. The precise nature of the infrastructure upgrades will be subject to detailed discussions with key stakeholders as the plan making process progresses. However, we can confirm that all of the necessary upgrades are either already being delivered through the Phase 1 development or would be delivered through the Phase 2 scheme on land our client controls sufficient to deliver wider upgrades within and around the site if they prove necessary.

In respect of deliverability, the land has no planning history of relevance nor any history of unimplemented permissions and there are no known impediments to the site being phased for early commencement within the 0 -5 year period.

No unexpected financial restrictions are anticipated that would impact upon the viability of the site nor that would prohibit development coming through within the early stages of the plan period. To the contrary, we consider there to be an opportunity to deliver a high quality and exemplar scheme.

The site is in control of a single land owner and there are no legal agreements or covenants that would prohibit the ability to bring the site forward early in the plan period.

Taking all of the above into account and having regard to the new development options currently subject to consultation, we consider our client's site continues to represent the most suitable and economically beneficial location for the immediate and longer term growth and expansion of Wymondham and falls in line with our preferred growth options as set out in our representations of March 2018.

Object

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 19601

Received: 14/12/2018

Respondent: Mr Richard Parker

Representation:

I feel that the site adjacent to Norwich Road and going towards Norwich from Spinks Lane is unsuitable The HELA report seems to agree with this view.
So much development has happened in this part of Wymondham by default because of land supply issues. It is now overdeveloped. with traffic on the Norwich road being considerable and going towards Hethersett rather than to Norwich via the A11.
The site also conflicts with the Wymondham/Hethersett 'Gap'

Full text:

I feel that the site adjacent to Norwich Road and going towards Norwich from Spinks Lane is unsuitable The HELA report seems to agree with this view.
So much development has happened in this part of Wymondham by default because of land supply issues. It is now overdeveloped. with traffic on the Norwich road being considerable and going towards Hethersett rather than to Norwich via the A11.
The site also conflicts with the Wymondham/Hethersett 'Gap'