GNLP2088

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Comment

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 17294

Received: 22/11/2018

Respondent: South Norfolk Council

Representation:

Surface water flood risk extending along the access route and large area into the centre of the site with depths above 300mm for all current day risk events.

Full text:

Surface water flood risk extending along the access route and large area into the centre of the site with depths above 300mm for all current day risk events.

Support

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 18760

Received: 12/12/2018

Respondent: Norfolk FA

Representation:

Norfolk FA are supportive of residential development in Harleston, associated to the proposed S106 agreement and potential to develop an open space which could host football provision. Harleston Town FC are a growing football club and have plans to try to develop either their existing facility, or a new facility which could host all of their football provision.

Full text:

Norfolk FA are supportive of residential development in Harleston, associated to the proposed S106 agreement and potential to develop an open space which could host football provision. Harleston Town FC are a growing football club and have plans to try to develop either their existing facility, or a new facility which could host all of their football provision.

Object

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 18892

Received: 10/12/2018

Respondent: Mr Ian Carstairs

Representation:

It is my view that sites GNLP2115, GNLP2116, GNLP2088 should not be accepted. 2115 and 2116 actually join up the parishes of Needham and Redenhall with Harleston in areas which play important parts in maintaining historic distinction between the two communities. Additionally, the views to either side of Needham Road having climbed from the by-pass towards the town offer long views which enhance the perception of the town's position in its wider rural setting. To allow these sites to be developed would render the principal tourist approach to the town, the first vision to greet the visitor, as nothing more than a massing of housing visited on the countryside, far from the concept of a historic settlement. A robust approach to maintaining this separation would show an appreciation of the bigger picture setting, not just the pursuit of a numbers quota for houses.

Full text:

Response to: Greater Norwich Local Plan Regulation 18 Consultation

1. Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the next stage of the Greater Norwich Local Plan (GNLP). I would be grateful if you would take my views into consideration.

2. As an overarching point it is clear that the submissions received would greatly exceed the target allocation for housing defined under the outlines for the Plan. This offers planners the opportunity to select the most appropriate places from within the suite of sites and the scope to guide developers to achieve the most beneficial solutions for the economic, social and environmental well-being of the area. My detailed observations follow.

Page 214 Section 5.42. Harleston

3. May I suggest that there are two further constraints to be added. The first is neglected every time a plan is produced and that is the physical impact of traffic generated on a tightly constrained town centre. Vehicular pressure and parking capacity are a significant issue in Harleston and a material consideration when judging the impact of development on the current settlement and should be acknowledged and assessed as such. The second constraint is the need to ensure that the separation from the adjacent village and parish of Needham is maintained on the Harleston side of the by-pass.

4. The community in Harleston has worked extremely hard over recent years to give real meaning to South Norfolk Council's Market Town's Initiative and has produced some spectacular contributions towards enhancing the tourism and resident commitment to the town and its hinterland.

5. A present project of the town council working with Norfolk County Highways and South Norfolk Council with the support of Harleston's Future is investigating trial phases of a Roads Traffic and Pedestrians Safety initiative to seek to lessen the impact of traffic in the town centre. Inadequately constrained additional development and failing to take this into account will only frustrate this long-running initiative, but no-one seems willing to acknowledge and incorporate this into true, rather than cosmetic strategic planning. The GNLP is an opportunity to do so.

Additional Site Proposals

General - Importance of character in relation to Tourism

6. Much store is placed on tourism as an economic driver for the district. Good strategic planning should therefore fully take into account the 'bigger picture' of the visual appearance of the Town as approached and the need to ensure that new developments do not diminish the character of the area.

7. It is appreciated that harmonising development with a town's rural setting is not easy to achieve if the style and density of modern houses is to continue as at present and especially where the houses have no meaningful gardens, within which trees and shrubbery would soften and enhance the appearance.

8. Today development seems to shroud existing historic rural towns with suburban sprawl in the countryside. Careful consideration is therefore needed to ensure that the town blends well into the surrounding landscape and presents an attractive face to those visiting. Solid blocks of insensitively placed high density housing seriously diminish the character of an area. I have already commented on the need to protect the approach to Harleston along Rushall Road, which can be achieved with imagination. Such an approach is also needed on a whole-town scale.

9. Taking a wider look at the setting of the town as viewed from the by-pass it can be seen that until recently Harleston sat well into its depression in the landscape and past developments rather nestled into the land form. However, very recent developments onto higher ground are significantly breaching this and with three-storey houses forming parts of development schemes these are radically eroding the appearance and adversely affecting the character of the town to such a degree that it feels rather hollow to think of Harleston as a market own, as opposed to the ubiquitous appearance of a dormitory semi-urban settlement.

10. It is therefore suggested that as a generality, moves are set in place now to ensure that whichever sites are accepted that where these might abut the bypass and perhaps other main access roads into town, a buffer corridor, ideally 20 meters wide of public amenity space is planted. This needs to be started now and to be incorporated into existing approved sites when any detailed planning applications are submitted.
11. The reason for suggesting 20 metres is to allow sufficient room for mature forest tree species, such as oak, to have room to fully develop, without consequential problems in years to come of broad and tall trees immediately on a narrow boundary line. It is only necessary to look at the line of trees planted in Spirketts Lane as screening for industrial units to see that oak trees 2 metres from the carriage way and close to a site boundary cannot flourish to full effect without impinging severely in very few years on the highway or neighbouring property.
12. As inevitably further sites contiguous to the by-pass are proposed in coming years, each part of the jigsaw can be completed to give a corridor right round the south/eastern aspect to the town, which will provide an excellent health walk and pleasant recreational facility while screening the urbanisation of the town to tourists and visitors alike. This is of economic relevance to the future of the town and quality of life and the character of the Waveney Valley. I note that there is no significant public space provision suggested in the proposals. In a town where 94% of its town centre public space is dominated by the needs of the motor vehicle something needs to be done to provide breathing space close to home for such dense concentrations of housing as are being built.

Site specific comments
13. It is good planning practice to ensure that distinct settlements are not allowed to 'join up' through allowing development which erodes the separation. This comment was made by planners over Local Plan submissions in the past and is a good and sound policy especially applicable to the boundary between Needham and Harleston.
14. It is my view that sites GNLP2115, GNLP2116, GNLP2088 should not be accepted. 2115 and 2116 actually join up the parishes of Needham and Redenhall with Harleston in areas which play important parts in maintaining historic distinction between the two communities. Additionally, the views to either side of Needham Road having climbed from the by-pass towards the town offer long views which enhance the perception of the town's position in its wider rural setting. To allow these sites to be developed would render the principal tourist approach to the town, the first vision to greet the visitor, as nothing more than a massing of housing visited on the countryside, far from the concept of a historic settlement. A robust approach to maintaining this separation would show an appreciation of the bigger picture setting, not just the pursuit of a numbers quota for houses.
15. For similar reasons I suggest that proposal GNLP2099 be not considered acceptable as it is rising ground and housing here on an elevated position would have a major and overbearing impact on the second most important approach to the town.
16. Thank you for taking the time to read my submission. I hope that you will find these comments helpful and that you are able to take them into account when finalising the next stages of the plan process.

Object

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 18942

Received: 13/12/2018

Respondent: Mrs Jacky Lond

Representation:

Needham road, because of the terraced houses without driveways already on this road is already congested due to parked cars. To add further houses coming out onto this road would compact the situation. The access shown in the plan onto Shotford road is on the brow of a hill and is not wide enough for passing traffic, therefore would not be suitable for such large scale housing. I hope planning decisions will be made primarily to develop brown field sites and smaller unproductive areas of agricultural land, rather than taking large areas of agricultural land out of the food chain.

Full text:

Needham road, because of the terraced houses without driveways already on this road is already congested due to parked cars. To add further houses coming out onto this road would compact the situation. The access shown in the plan onto Shotford road is on the brow of a hill and is not wide enough for passing traffic, therefore would not be suitable for such large scale housing. I hope planning decisions will be made primarily to develop brown field sites and smaller unproductive areas of agricultural land, rather than taking large areas of agricultural land out of the food chain.

Comment

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 19200

Received: 14/12/2018

Respondent: Redenhall with Harleston Town Council

Representation:

GNLP2088 - West of Shotford Road - Residential development - 150 dwellings proposed - Discounted - There are concerns about the narrow access from Shotford Road as this is a long narrow stretch of land which backs onto the existing development of Cherrywood which may add to noise pollution. Any access from this proposed development onto Needham Road will cause problems as it will open straight on to a hill with a sweeping corner making visibility poor. Needham is a historic entrance to the town which has on-street parking causing narrowing of the road to single lane.

Full text:

GNLP2088 - West of Shotford Road - Residential development - 150 dwellings proposed - Discounted - There are concerns about the narrow access from Shotford Road as this is a long narrow stretch of land which backs onto the existing development of Cherrywood which may add to noise pollution. Any access from this proposed development onto Needham Road will cause problems as it will open straight on to a hill with a sweeping corner making visibility poor. Needham is a historic entrance to the town which has on-street parking causing narrowing of the road to single lane.

Comment

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 19234

Received: 14/12/2018

Respondent: Redenhall with Harleston Town Council

Representation:

GNLP2088 - West of Shotford Road - Residential development - 150 dwellings proposed - Discounted - There are concerns about the narrow access from Shotford Road as this is a long narrow stretch of land which backs onto the existing development of Cherrywood which may add to noise pollution. Any access from this proposed development onto Needham Road will cause problems as it will open straight on to a hill with a sweeping corner making visibility poor. Needham is a historic entrance to the town which has on-street parking causing narrowing of the road to single lane.

Full text:

This is Redenhall with Harleston Town Council's response to the next stage of the Greater Norwich Local Plan (GNLP).
History
Harleston is a small, historic market town located in the Waveney Valley which forms part of the border between Norfolk and Suffolk. It is one of a network of market towns, generally located about 10 to 15 miles apart across East Anglia to provide commercial, social and marketing services for the surrounding rural community. This largely remains its main purpose today. It has also developed into a dormitory town and a pleasant location for retired people.
In 1961, the population was 1,809, which was possibly slight less than it was before the First World War. Expansion then started, amounting to 2,284 in 1971, 2,954 in 1981 and 3,725 in 1991. By 2001 it had passed 4,000 and by 2011 reached 4,641. It is estimated that in 2017 the population passed the 5,000 mark. To provide housing for these increases, many dwellings were built on sites throughout the town which had previously provided employment for over 1,000 people. These jobs in the town have not been replaced to the same level and there seems little prospect of doing so. Residents have to travel further for employment and this, coupled with changing living styles, has resulted in increased dependency on cars. The sparsity of public transport has not helped in this regard.
Other than the opening of the by-pass to divert traffic on the main A143 route away from the town centre in the 1970's, there have been no infrastructure improvements made during this period of population expansion. There has also been a decline in other facilities. The town has lost one church and an associated hall, the old youth centre was closed by Norfolk County Council and was saved from possible residential development by the Catholic Church who have allowed for some youth club and other social activities to continue. The Womens Institute Hall and the Oddfellows Hall, both which provided a large function room and regular entertainment events, as well as extensive snooker and pool playing facilities has closed. The Town Council own the Leisure Centre, which has been the venue for a wide range of social activity, and still continues to be so, in a streamlined form, now has a flourishing gymnasium which is used by the wider community living inside and outside the town.
The primary school located in the town, now has to use pre-fabricated classrooms due to many more children attending and will no doubt struggle to cope with further intakes.
The town centre provides a popular shopping venue, but because of its basic layout, was formed before the arrival of motorised transport and there is more frequent congestion on the roads and parking provision often reaches capacity.
Unless these varied infrastructure and social problems are tackled beforehand, residents and the Town Council are unlikely to welcome further new developments and formal objections may be expected at the planning stage.
Today
It is the council's understanding that the submissions received during Regulation 18 greatly exceed the target allocation for housing within the parish. This gives planners the ideal opportunity to consider the most appropriate sites given all the other considerations that must be taken into account during a consultation such as this. Examples that must be given urgent attention in Harleston is parking, school capacities and doctor's and dentists, the whole infrastructure must be looked at first before any large housing developments are built. Of particular concern, is the flash flooding that the town sometimes suffers during sudden heavy rainfall which runs like a river down The Thoroughfare and pools at the end of town towards Redenhall. This situation will not be improved by more permeable ground being used for large amounts of development.
Comments on sites under Regulation 18
GNLP 2136 - Briar Farm - Residential Development - 350 dwellings proposed - Acceptable - The proposed site is large, some 27ha, with a potential residential-led mixed development of upto 350 dwellings. Consideration should be taken on not only the overall impact of such a large development, but the impact on the rural nature of the approach to the town via the A143. If this site is accepted for development, careful consideration must be given to the design and environmental approach to the houses. A plan to plant a woodland area along the perimeter of the development would shield properties from traffic noise from the by-pass as well as providing a softer welcoming approach to the town, and due consideration of the same nature must be afforded to the residents living on Jays Green. It would not be acceptable to put a road exiting from the development onto Jays Green, as this is a narrow road with a difficult junction at the top of School Lane which is only approx. 50 metres away from the start of the potential development. Concerns have been raised as to whether a pedestrian access from the development onto Jays Green would be installed. If this was the case, it should be noted that it is narrow along this stretch of road, with only a pavement on one side. As previously mentioned there is a dangerous junction at the top of School Lane/Jays Green with no footpath on the road at all. There is already a large number of children using this area from Briar Road and Bullfinch Drive and is heavily congested at school times.
Light pollution and light spillage onto neighbouring properties is a significant issue. There are real concerns over the character of new LED lights and their colour temperature. It is hoped that policies are adopted to ensure lighting of the most benign nature is accepted. A starting point can be found in the information provided in the Cranborne Chase and West Wiltshire AONB planning advice. This is easily achieved if established firmly at the outset for any new works. Colour temperature of 3000k or less with lights fully shrouded and properly aimed to illuminate only the target area would be a wise logical rationale.
GNLP2105 - Mendham Lane - Residential development - 20 dwellings proposed - Discounted - This site is currently in use as allotments, and the town council are of the opinion that this would again give an overbearing approach into the industrial/town area as this site sits adjacent to GNLP2136
GNLP2088 - West of Shotford Road - Residential development - 150 dwellings proposed - Discounted - There are concerns about the narrow access from Shotford Road as this is a long narrow stretch of land which backs onto the existing development of Cherrywood which may add to noise pollution. Any access from this proposed development onto Needham Road will cause problems as it will open straight on to a hill with a sweeping corner making visibility poor. Needham is a historic entrance to the town which has on-street parking causing narrowing of the road to single lane.
GNLP2098 - North of Green Lane - Residential development - 65 dwellings proposed - Discounted - There is no logical way that this site could be accessed given the constraints of the surrounding area. Green Lane is a narrow footpath which leads to the by-pass and there is no route viable through either Lovat Close or Church View. The adjoining site of GNLP2099 has also been discounted (see below)
GNLP2099 - South of Redenhall Road - Residential development -110 dwellings proposed - Discounted - The rising ground from Redenhall Road towards the roundabout is often flooded, due to water running off the fields, this creates problems for drivers entering the town. The approach to the town would be compromised by development overlooking over the main road and would be an unattractive entrance to this historic market town.
GNLP2108 - South of Spirketts Lane - Residential development - 160 - 175 dwellings proposed - Acceptable but not as far as the by-pass - As this site has housing to the west and commitments to the north and east, the council would not be adverse to this site being developed in the future.
GNLP2115 - North of Needham Road - Residential development - Discounted - concerns regarding flood risk at Needham roundabout and loss of agricultural land on the historic entrance to the town. This will join the parishes of Needham and Redenhall with Harleston in areas which play important parts in maintaining historic distinction between the two communities. Access to this proposed site on to Needham Road will cause problems as per GNLP2088.
GNLP2116 - South of Needham Road - Residential development - 160 dwellings proposed - Discounted - for the same reasons as GNLP 2115

Support

New, Revised and Small Sites

Representation ID: 19539

Received: 14/12/2018

Respondent: Durrants Ltd

Representation:

With respect to site reference GNLP2088 the applicant welcomes the Council's conclusions that the site represents a suitable site for future residential development and provide for the natural expansion of Harleston. We highlight that there are no fundamental constraints or impacts that cannot be mitigated through the subsequent policy allocation, applications and development process

We would stress that the proposals put forward in contrast to recent speculative applications and individual piecemeal development within the District represent an opportunity to help deliver a plan-led future for Harleston and wider local community. One that addresses the specific existing and future needs of the District and the local community in a sustainable and accessible location and at the same time seeks to minimise the environmental impacts of future development. We would therefore welcome your support for the inclusion of the above site in the emerging joint local plan.

See attachment for full details of submission.

Full text:

See attachment for full details of submission.

Attachments: